Barry Sharpless, second Nobel Prize in Chemistry

ANDREW SEIDE / AFP K. Barry Sharpless, Ph.D, speaks to a room full of reporters and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute after winning the 101st Nobel Prize in Chemistry October 10, 2001 in La Jolla, California. Sharpless was credited with developing catalytic asymmetric synthesis with William S Knowles of Monsanto and Ryoji Noyori of Nagoya University in Japan. AFP PHOTO/Andrew SILK (Photo by ANDREW SILK / AFP)

ANDREW SEIDE / AFP

K. Barry Sharpless, Ph.D, speaks to a room full of reporters and colleagues at the Scripps Research Institute after winning the 101st Nobel Prize in Chemistry October 10, 2001 in La Jolla, California. Sharpless was credited with developing catalytic asymmetric synthesis with William S Knowles of Monsanto and Ryoji Noyori of Nagoya University in Japan. AFP PHOTO/Andrew SILK (Photo by ANDREW SILK / AFP)

SCIENCE – The distribution of the 2022 Nobel Prizes continues. After medicine and physics, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded this Wednesday, October 5th, to the American Carolyn R. Bertozzi, the Dane Morten Meldal and the American K. Barry Sharpless.

You will be rewarded for “developing click chemistry and bioorthogonal chemistry.” “Click chemistry” is a new way of connecting molecules.
This is used in particular to develop pharmaceutical treatments, map DNA or create new materials.

81-year-old Barry Sharpless is the fifth laureate to have received two Nobel Prizes. He had already won it in 2001. Before him, Marie Curie had studied physics (1903) and then chemistry (1911). Frederick Sanger, the father of DNA sequencing, received chemistry (1958) and medicine (1962), John Bardeen, who discovered the transistor effect, received two Nobel prizes in physics (1956-1972), and Linus Pauling received chemistry (1954) and then peace (1962). .

Ten years prizewinner in chemistry

In front of these three scientists, Here are the names of the ten previous Nobel Prize winners for their work:

  • 2021: Benjamin List (Germany) and David MacMillan (UK) for inventing a new method to produce molecules with a new type of catalyst, at a lower cost and in a cleaner way.
  • 2020: Emmanuelle Charpentier (France) and Jennifer Doudna (USA) for the development of “ molecular scissors » able to modify human genes, a revolutionary breakthrough.
  • 2019: John Goodenough (USA), Stanley Whittingham (UK) and Akira Yoshino (Japan) for the invention of lithium-ion batteries, present in many everyday technologies today.
  • 2018: Frances H. Arnold (USA), George P. Smith (USA) and Gregory P. Winter (UK) for their work on harnessing the mechanisms of evolution to create new and better proteins in the laboratory.
  • 2017: Jacques Dubochet (Switzerland), Joachim Frank (USA) and Richard Henderson (UK) for the development of cryo-electron microscopy, a revolutionary method for observing molecules in conjunction with 3D imaging.
  • 2016: Jean-Pierre Sauvage (France), Fraser Stoddart (UK) and Bernard Feringa (Netherlands), the fathers of Tiny “ Molecular Machines » anticipating the nanorobots of the future.
  • 2015: Aziz Sancar (Turkey/USA), Paul Modrich (USA) and Tomas Lindahl (Sweden) for their work on DNA repair.
  • 2014: Eric Betzig (USA), William Moerner (USA) and Stefan Hell (Germany) for improving the microscope that allows him to see the infinitesimal.
  • 2013: Martin Karplus (US/Austria), Michael Levitt (US/UK) and Arieh Warshel (US/Israel) for developing models for complex chemical systems to optimize catalysts, drugs and photovoltaic cells.
  • 2012: Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka (USA) for their work on receptors that allow cells to understand their environment, a major breakthrough for the pharmaceutical industry.

The next rewards will be given according to the following schedule:

  • Literature, Thursday, October 6, 1 p.m
  • Peace, Friday, October 7 at 11 a.m
  • Economy, Monday 10 October at 11:45 am

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